Breakfast, lunch, and refreshment breaks are provided each day, and participants are on their own for dinner. Participants frequently organize themselves into dinner parties at the reception on the first day. A reservation discount at the hotel when the workshop is being held is provided to assist in making travel arrangements, but participants are welcome to stay elsewhere if they choose.

We ask participants to arrive to the workshop location at 8:00 am on the first day to register and pick up the workshop notebook. Some participants choose to sleep a little later on the second day and skip the breakfast, but it is still important to arrive to the workshop location by 8:30 am sharp—we don’t enjoy people wandering in during the first ten minutes of class any more than you do. We also understand that sometimes the best itinerary for some participants requires that they leave before 3:00 on the last day. There is a culminating activity that integrates all you have learned, gets you to firm up some plans for your class, and promotes sharing ideas among all the workshop attendees, so we hope that participants can stay the whole time.

Participants don’t need computers—all the information we present and more will be in your notebooks, and we generally can’t guarantee access to power at the tables or Internet access in the room. That said, many participants have course materials on their computers and are welcome to bring computers to the workshop. We ask that participants who bring computers avoid working on unrelated projects during the workshop in ways that disrupt others. This is a highly interactive workshop.

We do ask that participants bring materials for a course they will be teaching. These materials should include a complete syllabus, learning objectives, sample exam and sample project assignments (including several homework assignments), especially some for a section or topics in a course that they would like to improve.If participants don’t have some or any of those things it’s okay, but participants get more out of the workshop if they can apply some of its suggestions immediately to their own teaching. 

We’ve found that participants benefit from a brief review of material from NETI-1. It is also very helpful for you to think about your desired higher-level course outcomes to help you get the most from the workshop activities. Participants who have not attended NETI-1, but who believe they are prepared for NETI-2 should review the NETI-1 learning objectives to be properly prepared.

If you have any questions about workshop content, please send them to Mike Prince at prince@bucknell.edu.